Kramden Computers in Kentucky

 

25 Kramden computers are being put to use by the Housing Authority of Bowling Green. Check out the article below from the Bowling Green Daily News to learn more.

 

“Housing Authority Gets New Computers” by Justin Story

In an effort to increase accessibility, the Housing Authority of Bowling Green received 25 new computers for its two computer labs.

Charter Communications donated the desktop computers, and an event Thursday at the housing authority’s learning center marked the occasion.

Kathye Gumm, project manager for the housing authority, said the new computers, which have been installed in the labs, are essential for children and adults who rely increasingly on the internet.

 “The kids all have homework they have to do and adults come in to do job searches,” Gumm said. “These computers will get a lot of use.”

In addition to the many after-school and summer learning programs for students, the learning center computer labs are often used by people who file their taxes in the early months of the year, Gumm said.

The Reach Higher Welfare to Work Program also makes use of the computer labs.

Participants in the program work in a housing authority department for 30 hours a week and take part in four weekly hours of job and life-skills training at the lab.

“If you don’t have access to the internet, you’re going to fall behind,” Gumm said.

 Along with the donated computers, Charter announced the introduction of a high-speed broadband internet service aimed at low-income households.

Spectrum Internet Assist will be available to families with students who participate in the National School Lunch Program and seniors 65 or older who receive Supplemental Security Income program benefits.

“We have a lot of people who have access to the internet but don’t have the financial means to get it,” said Jason Keller of Charter, which is partnering with the housing authority to launch the service.

Gumm said several residents rely on wireless internet hot spots such as the Graham Drive branch of the Warren County Public Library for internet service.

“After the library closes, you’ll see kids sitting outside and it shouldn’t be like that,” Gumm said. “They should be safe in their homes online instead of outside looking for a hot spot.”

Find the original article here