Durham public housing community gets free high-speed internet Google Fiber access

 

Reposted from the Herald Sun. Read the original story here

In the Laurel Oaks neighborhood, if it happens, Shaqueelah Shaw knows about it.

That’s why she was first in line when she heard Google Fiber was coming to her neighborhood.

Google, the tech company best known for its online search engine, is bringing its high-speed internet service to Durham one neighborhood at a time.

This time Google paired with the Durham Housing Authority to offer its high-speed service free to a public housing neighborhood — the first in Durham and in the state, according to Google officials who were at an unveiling on Saturday at Laurel Oaks. They said more public housing neighborhoods would receive the free service in the future.

Shaw said having Google as an option for internet service was a huge blessing. She was switching from a pay service to the free Google service and will save about $70 per month, which is the cost of the company’s Fiber 1000 plan.

“I knew about Google but not Google Fiber,” Shaw said. “When they came to my house and talked about it with me, I knew it was going to be good for my family and all the residents here. I’m one of the most active residents out here and I let others know what’s going on. I try to keep everyone aware because there are so many changes we’re seeing.”

Laurel Oaks, which is near the intersection of East Cornwallis Road and Alston Avenue, has 30 apartments that all received the Fiber internet connection. It was chosen because of its proximity to Google’s main Fiber line and for the high number of families with school-age children living there.

Daniel Hudgins, who is chairman of the DHA board of commissioners, said Laurel Oaks was an ideal candidate for the program.

“This broadband access will be such a benefit for the families with school-age children,” Hudgins said.

Laurel Oaks, which is one of 16 Durham Housing Authority neighborhoods in the city, is one of the smaller communities.

It took about 18 months for the project, which is part of a federal HUD program called ConnectHome Community, to become a reality.

“This is the first Durham Housing Authority neighborhood to receive Google Fiber,” said Sam Wicks, who works with ConnectHome for the Durham Housing Authority. “The whole point of this is to eliminate the digital divide.”

Wicks said this is a national initiative and Durham was chosen to be among the first cities to participate.

Faster internet is not the only service being offered. Residents are receiving digital literacy training and support, too.

The non-profit Kramden Institute is offering free refurbished computers so that they can get online.“We’ve done more than bring internet,” said Google community impact manager Tia Bethea. “We’ve had digital literacy training as well as followup classes for residents. We’ve made sure everyone has a device in their home and now we’re bringing service to them and the neighborhood. There are so many benefits of having a faster internet connection for people looking for jobs and helping their children with their homework.”

Durham Mayor Steve Schewel said Google’s presence in Durham will continue to grow beyond its program with the DHA.

“This is wonderful,” Schewel said. “This neighborhood is receiving the highest speed internet Google offers. And as Google expands into Durham, they’re going to be continuing to wire other neighborhoods, including more Durham Housing Authority communities.”

 

Eric has been part of the Kramden team since 2013 and currently serves as the Director of Development and Marketing.

Kramden partner receives Goodmon Award

Angela Caraway, the founder of the Caraway Foundation, has helped Kramden put computers into more than 500 households in Anson County. She was recently presented with the Goodmon Award for Strategic Partnerships by Leadership Triangle.
In this short video, she talks about how she became involved with Kramden and the impact of our partnership. Thank you, Angela, for everything you do!

 

 

Eric has been part of the Kramden team since 2013 and currently serves as the Director of Development and Marketing.

Fort Bragg soldiers’ children receive computers through giveaway program

 

Reposted from the Fayetteville Observer. Read the original story here

Caiden and Kinsley Thompson were attentive as a technician showed them different parts of their new computer, which parents Jessica and Shawn said would be put to good use for homework assignments this year.

“They’re always asking me to be on the computer,” said Jessica, explaining the family has one laptop computer that is mostly used for her husband’s work.

Now, through a computer giveaway program, the family will have another option to help the children complete their own assignments.

Two hundred children of Fort Bragg soldiers received refurbished computers through a computer giveaway program last week. The program, made possible by a partnership between Lenovo, Kramden Institute Inc. and Fort Bragg’s Army Community Service and Child and Youth Services, benefits children in grades kindergarten through 12.

Donated computers are refurbished by Lenovo and Kramden Institute, which then work through Fort Bragg and other military installations in North Carolina to distribute to children of military families. More than 1,250 computers have been donated through the program.

“What matters is we’re putting technology in the hands of folks,” said Scott Ottman, vice president of Lenovo sales operations.

Before receiving their computers, families met with experts for a tutorial on usage.

It’s the sixth year Lenovo and Kramden Institute have donated computers to Fort Bragg children. Families are selected through an application process.

The donated computers help children tackle homework assignments without competing for time on the family computer, said Gerhard Guevarra, a school liaison officer for Fort Bragg’s Children and Youth Services. He said he understands children count on computers to complete assignments, but not every child has access to computers at home.

“When a family doesn’t have a computer at home, they can still do things, but that’s an inconvenience,” he said, noting that children can stay after school to use the computer labs. “This program tries to level the playing field for all kids in school.”

 

Eric has been part of the Kramden team since 2013 and currently serves as the Director of Development and Marketing.

Bailey students get computers

 

By Mark Cone. Read the original story here

Sixty students at Bailey Elementary who did not previously have a computer in their home now have access to one thanks to a recent partnership between the Kramden Institute of Durham and Southern Bank.

The partnership worked directly with the Kramden Tech Scholars program, which is a program that helps the institute donate computers to students in grades 3-12 who do not have one at home.

Funding assistance provided through Southern Bank insures no family incurs any cost to receive a computer.

Mandatory training sessions were held for all students who received one of the computers at the school before being allowed to take the computer home. The training covered basic operations of the computer and a parent was required to pick the computer up to take it home.

Children receiving computers were selected through a survey that was done of the school’s fourth and fifth graders to determine home computer needs. Once all of the responses were collected and processed, it was determined that fourth grade had the higher need.

Earlier grades were not considered because they do not utilize computer-based end of grade testing like the fourth and fifth grade levels do. Fifth grade students already have digital devices through the Nash-Rocky Mount Public Schools 1:1 digital initiative.

“We are so grateful to receive this grant, as it will provide our students more digital educational opportunities.” said Bailey Elementary School Principal Mary Jones. “I would like to thank the Kramden Institute and Southern Bank for funding this program and making it possible for families in our school to become more digital.”

“Ensuring students have the digital resources they need in order to succeed in the classroom is critical, so we thank the Kramden Institute and Southern Bank for providing the needed resources for many of our students,” Said NRMS Superintendent Dr. Shelton Jefferies.

“We appreciate their generosity and are thankful they have allowed our district to be part of this program on many occasions,” he said.

 

Eric has been part of the Kramden team since 2013 and currently serves as the Director of Development and Marketing.

Kramden Receives Spectrum Digital Education Grant

We are thrilled to announce the Kramden is one of the nonprofit organizations that Charter Communications chose to receive the Spectrum Digital Education Grant. The funding will be used to offer 6 rounds of our digital literacy classes to senior citizens in Orange, Wake, and Durham counties in 2018.

To learn more about the Spectrum DIgital Education Grant, check out the press release from Charter below.

STAMFORD, Conn.Nov. 13, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ: CHTR) today announced winners of its Spectrum Digital Education Grants, a new philanthropic initiative designed to support nonprofit organizations that educate community members on the benefits of broadband and how to use it to improve their lives. These grants totaling approximately $400,000 are part of a $1 million commitment to provide digital education in Charter communities through financial grants. Additionally, Charter is committed to PSAs, workshops and webinars to local nonprofit organizations.

Charter received more than 200 eligible grant applications and awarded Digital Education grants to 17 nonprofit organizations.

Below is a complete list of award winners:

  1. Austin Free-Net
  2. Central Florida Urban League
  3. Connected Nation
  4. DANEnet
  5. E2D, Inc. – Eliminate the Digital Divide
  6. Keystone Community Services
  7. Kramden Institute
  8. LA’s BEST
  9. LULAC National Educational Service Centers, Inc.
  10. San Diego Futures Foundation
  11. Shenango Valley Urban League, Inc.
  12. St. Louis Arc
  13. The Oasis Institute
  14. Urban League of Greater Kansas City
  15. Urban League of Rochester, NY, Inc.
  16. Waipahu Community Association
  17. Westcott Community Center

“We couldn’t be more pleased with the interest generated and the quality of the submissions received for the Spectrum Digital Education Grant Program,” said Rahman Khan, Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility for Charter Communications. “After careful review, we are confident that the selected organizations will help further our mission to provide communities in need with the necessary tools to grow and prosper in the digital age.”

Spectrum is committed to improving communities and impacting lives where our customers and employees live, work and play.  We do this through our two signature programs, Spectrum Digital Education – focusing on helping families and seniors learn more about digital technology in underrepresented communities, and Spectrum Housing Assist – with the goal of making 25,000 homes safer and healthier by the year 2020.

The latest news, resources, and information regarding Charter Communications’ philanthropic initiatives and events, can be found at responsibility.spectrum.com.

 

Eric has been part of the Kramden team since 2013 and currently serves as the Director of Development and Marketing.

Coders Club Celebrates 18 months

Last February, Kramden volunteers Ashlyn VanDine and her father Ken began Kramden Coders Club. After 18 months, 12 club meetings, and 2 Intro to Programming workshops, more than 100 middle school students from all over the Triangle have taken part in fun programming projects. Ashlyn, who is entering 8th grade at Rogers-Herr Middle School and is a Kramden SuperGeek, writes:
“In Coders Club, we’ve had some great fun with the Raspberry Pi computers, learning about Python as well as physical computing. We’ve built a laser tripwire using light sensors and LED lights. We’ve worked with buttons, lights, resistors, and buzzers. We’ve learned how to interface with Minecraft Pi using Python, making a teleport button which would teleport the player to a location when the physical button is pushed. We’ve created puzzle boxes and games using the motion sensors and LEDs on the Sense HAT attachment, and programmed music in Sonic Pi.”
 We’re grateful to the Raleigh ISSA chapter for donating 10 Raspberry Pi computer kits, and to the many volunteers who have helped out at club meetings. Coders Club meets again this month.

Kramden Computers in Kentucky

 

25 Kramden computers are being put to use by the Housing Authority of Bowling Green. Check out the article below from the Bowling Green Daily News to learn more.

 

“Housing Authority Gets New Computers” by Justin Story

In an effort to increase accessibility, the Housing Authority of Bowling Green received 25 new computers for its two computer labs.

Charter Communications donated the desktop computers, and an event Thursday at the housing authority’s learning center marked the occasion.

Kathye Gumm, project manager for the housing authority, said the new computers, which have been installed in the labs, are essential for children and adults who rely increasingly on the internet.

 “The kids all have homework they have to do and adults come in to do job searches,” Gumm said. “These computers will get a lot of use.”

In addition to the many after-school and summer learning programs for students, the learning center computer labs are often used by people who file their taxes in the early months of the year, Gumm said.

The Reach Higher Welfare to Work Program also makes use of the computer labs.

Participants in the program work in a housing authority department for 30 hours a week and take part in four weekly hours of job and life-skills training at the lab.

“If you don’t have access to the internet, you’re going to fall behind,” Gumm said.

 Along with the donated computers, Charter announced the introduction of a high-speed broadband internet service aimed at low-income households.

Spectrum Internet Assist will be available to families with students who participate in the National School Lunch Program and seniors 65 or older who receive Supplemental Security Income program benefits.

“We have a lot of people who have access to the internet but don’t have the financial means to get it,” said Jason Keller of Charter, which is partnering with the housing authority to launch the service.

Gumm said several residents rely on wireless internet hot spots such as the Graham Drive branch of the Warren County Public Library for internet service.

“After the library closes, you’ll see kids sitting outside and it shouldn’t be like that,” Gumm said. “They should be safe in their homes online instead of outside looking for a hot spot.”

Find the original article here

 

 

Kramden Computers in Belize

Working with our longtime partner Rise Against Hunger (formerly Stop Hunger Now), 15 Kramden computers are in Belize. The systems are set up in a computer lab at Silk Grass Methodist School in the Stann Creek district of southern Belize. Southern Belize has a significantly higher rate of poverty than the northern part of the country and in the Stann Creek District, only 6 of the 36 primary schools had computers for the students to use.

A representative from KidzKonnect4Jesus, the local organization Rise Against Hunger partners with for their work in Belize, had this to say:

“For the vast majority of the 350 students at Silk Grass Methodist School in southern Belize, they touched the keyboard of a computer for the very first time thanks to the donation of much needed computers.  This includes children 13 and 14 years old.  The basic math and spelling programs preloaded captivated their attention like nothing we’ve ever seen before.  The teachers were amazed at the unusually calm and patient behavior as they waited quietly for their turn.  While we are early on with this program, everyone is very excited about this being a real “game changer” to drastically improve our learning process and literacy rates.”

 

 

 

Eric has been part of the Kramden team since 2013 and currently serves as the Director of Development and Marketing.

A Kramden Super Geek won a STEMmy Award!

One of our awesome Super Geek volunteers, Ashlyn VanDine, was presented with the STEM Student of the Year 7-12 award at the Second Annual STEMmy Awards. The STEMmy awards, hosted by STEM in the Park, recognize students, educators, and organizations for the great work they are doing in STEM fields. Congratulations Ashlyn!

A full list of this year’s winners and pictures from the ceremony can be found here.

Kramden featured in NCTA Member Spotlight

 

 

 

Kramden Institute was featured in the North Carolina Technology Association’s Member Spotlight for April 2017. Read the full profile here.